Language-specific policies

Python

Eclass usage

PG

0501

Source

Python project

Reference

https://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/Project:Python/Eclasses

Reported

by pkgcheck

All packages using Python (either through installing Python modules or scripts, linking to libpython, calling Python at runtime or build time) must do it through one of the python-r1 eclasses. Packages must not directly depend on Python, directly use PYTHON_SINGLE_TARGET or PYTHON_TARGETS. The variables and functions provided by the eclasses must be used instead.

All ebuilds must explicitly define supported Python implementations in PYTHON_COMPAT. Dependencies between Python packages must use PYTHON_USEDEP, PYTHON_SINGLE_USEDEP or python_gen_cond_dep in order to ensure implementation match.

Rationale: the eclass code guarantees consistent and reliable handling of slotted Python. It ensures that the whole dependency graph uses matching implementation and that programs will not accidentally break if user changes his Python preferences. The helper functions and variables also make it possible to gracefully retire old implementations with minimal changes to existing ebuilds.

Python 2 deprecation

PG

0502

Source

Python project

Reference

https://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/Project:Python#Python_2_end-of-life

Reported

no

Python 2 is being phased out of Gentoo packages. Python 2 support must not be introduced in new packages, unless explicitly required to maintain compatibility with existing packages. Packages that do not support Python 3 should be removed sooner or later, depending on Python 3 porting chances.

In packages that support both Python 2 and Python 3, the Python 2 support should be gracefully retired, as soon as their reverse dependencies are ready or removed.

Rationale: Python 2 has reached its (deferred) end-of-life by the end of 2019. Many important upstream projects have already removed support for Python 2. Those packages are frequently dependencies of other packages, causing the cost of maintaining Python 2 support to grow exponentially.

Early removal of unnecessary Python 2 support will both reduce the long-term maintenance costs, and give users better chance to prepare than delaying it until the number of packages losing Python 2 support will cause major upgrade issues.